1. killuangel:

    "it’s like freud always said," says the ‘psychologist’ character in the movie, making everyone in the audience who knows anything at all about psychology flinch involuntarily

  2. neurosciencestuff:

Neuroscience: Where is the brain in the Human Brain Project?
Launched in October 2013, the Human Brain Project (HBP) was sold by charismatic neurobiologist Henry Markram as a bold new path towards understanding the brain, treating neurological diseases and building information technology. It is one of two ‘flagship’ proposals funded by the European Commission’s Future and Emerging Technologies programme (see go.nature.com/icotmi). Selected after a multiyear competition, the project seemed like an exciting opportunity to bring together neuroscience and IT to generate practical applications for health and medicine (see go.nature.com/2eocv8).
Contrary to public assumptions that the HBP would generate knowledge about how the brain works, the project is turning into an expensive database-management project with a hunt for new computing architectures. In recent months, the HBP executive board revealed plans to drastically reduce its experimental and cognitive neuroscience arm, provoking wrath in the European neuroscience community.
The crisis culminated with an open letter from neuroscientists (including one of us, G.L.) to the European Commission on 7 July 2014 (see www.neurofuture.eu), which has now gathered more than 750 signatures. Many signatories are scientists in experimental and theoretical fields, and the list includes former HBP participants. The letter incorporates a pledge of non-participation in a planned call for ‘partnering projects’ that must raise about half of the HBP’s total funding. This pledge could seriously lower the quality of the project’s final output and leave the planned databases empty.
With the initial funding, or ‘ramp-up’, phase now in full swing, the European Commission is currently evaluating the HBP directors’ plan for the larger second part of the project. This offers an opportunity to introduce reforms and reconciliation. Here, we offer our analysis of how the HBP project strayed off course and how it might be steered back.
Read more

    neurosciencestuff:

    Neuroscience: Where is the brain in the Human Brain Project?

    Launched in October 2013, the Human Brain Project (HBP) was sold by charismatic neurobiologist Henry Markram as a bold new path towards understanding the brain, treating neurological diseases and building information technology. It is one of two ‘flagship’ proposals funded by the European Commission’s Future and Emerging Technologies programme (see go.nature.com/icotmi). Selected after a multiyear competition, the project seemed like an exciting opportunity to bring together neuroscience and IT to generate practical applications for health and medicine (see go.nature.com/2eocv8).

    Contrary to public assumptions that the HBP would generate knowledge about how the brain works, the project is turning into an expensive database-management project with a hunt for new computing architectures. In recent months, the HBP executive board revealed plans to drastically reduce its experimental and cognitive neuroscience arm, provoking wrath in the European neuroscience community.

    The crisis culminated with an open letter from neuroscientists (including one of us, G.L.) to the European Commission on 7 July 2014 (see www.neurofuture.eu), which has now gathered more than 750 signatures. Many signatories are scientists in experimental and theoretical fields, and the list includes former HBP participants. The letter incorporates a pledge of non-participation in a planned call for ‘partnering projects’ that must raise about half of the HBP’s total funding. This pledge could seriously lower the quality of the project’s final output and leave the planned databases empty.

    With the initial funding, or ‘ramp-up’, phase now in full swing, the European Commission is currently evaluating the HBP directors’ plan for the larger second part of the project. This offers an opportunity to introduce reforms and reconciliation. Here, we offer our analysis of how the HBP project strayed off course and how it might be steered back.

    Read more

  3. intbrainresearchorg:

    The results are in for the 2014 Brain Awareness Video Contest! The winner is Leigha Phillips, former student at Rhode Island School of Design, for “Vision and Illusion.” Watch her video now: http://ow.ly/AZxV8

    Find out more information about the BAVC, including videos for additional high-scoring contestants: http://ow.ly/AZQu5

  4. "Debugging Matlab code can be an infuriating and humiliating experience that makes you want to quit science and sell flowers on the street."
    Mike Cohen - Analysing Neural Time Series Data
  5. HOW I FEEL WHEN DOING OBSCURE LITERATURE SEARCHES

    whatshouldwecallgradschool:

    credit: Nick

    I’m sure I’ve reblogged this before, but I just have to do it again.

  6. "My fundamental premise about the brain is that its workings – what we sometimes call the ‘mind’ – are a consequence of its anatomy and physiology, and nothing more."
    Carl Sagan, The Dragons of Eden (via whats-out-there)
  7. "I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it."
    Robert M. Sapolsky (via pridejoyetc)
  8. So important in grad school.

    So important in grad school.

  9. "When you truly believe in what you are doing, it shows. And it pays. Winners in life are those who are excited about where they’re going."

About me

Hi, and welcome to my blog! This is where I collect things that I find interesting about the brain, neuroscience, pyschology and more recently, grad school.

Ok so first, a bit about my background. I did a B.Sc. (Hons) in Psychology, and now I am a first year neuroscience and neuroimaging Ph.D. student. In my PhD I look at the brain mechanisms underlying multisensory perception, using functional imaging, psychophysics and computational modelling.

To make things a bit easier, I tag things that are related to my PhD or any of my side projects here.

Questions? I am more than happy to answer any questions you have, and I really enjoy it, so if you have something to you want to know, click the “Ask Me” button above and I will do my best to answer you. If you prefer me to answer privately, please mention it in your ask. You can see some of the previous questions I’ve answered here.

Finally, some of my writing can be found here.

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