1. HOW I FEEL WHEN DOING OBSCURE LITERATURE SEARCHES

    whatshouldwecallgradschool:

    credit: Nick

    I’m sure I’ve reblogged this before, but I just have to do it again.

  2. "My fundamental premise about the brain is that its workings – what we sometimes call the ‘mind’ – are a consequence of its anatomy and physiology, and nothing more."
    Carl Sagan, The Dragons of Eden (via whats-out-there)
  3. "I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it."
    Robert M. Sapolsky (via pridejoyetc)
  4. So important in grad school.

    So important in grad school.

  5. "When you truly believe in what you are doing, it shows. And it pays. Winners in life are those who are excited about where they’re going."
  6. s-c-i-guy:

Hair cells: the sound-sensing cells in the ear
These cells get their name from the hairlike structures that extend from them into the fluid-filled tube of the inner ear. When sound reaches the ear, the hairs bend and the cells convert this movement into signals that are relayed to the brain. When we pump up the music in our cars or join tens of thousands of cheering fans at a football stadium, the noise can make the hairs bend so far that they actually break, resulting in long-term hearing loss. 
Image courtesy of Henning Horn, Brian Burke and Colin Stewart, Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology, and Research, Singapore. 
source

    s-c-i-guy:

    Hair cells: the sound-sensing cells in the ear

    These cells get their name from the hairlike structures that extend from them into the fluid-filled tube of the inner ear. When sound reaches the ear, the hairs bend and the cells convert this movement into signals that are relayed to the brain. When we pump up the music in our cars or join tens of thousands of cheering fans at a football stadium, the noise can make the hairs bend so far that they actually break, resulting in long-term hearing loss.

    Image courtesy of Henning Horn, Brian Burke and Colin Stewart, Institute of Medical Biology, Agency for Science, Technology, and Research, Singapore.

    source

  7. Hi! 

I’m not sure whether you can work in research without the Masters or PhD if I’m being honest. I volunteered as a research assistant during undergrad, but I’m assuming jobs that pay MAY want you to have the research background. It might be different for lab technicians? I’m not sure as I’ve just gone down the research route and everyone I work with in the lab and uni is either doing their phd or has it already. 

I think it’s important to point out that I had no real idea about a narrow research interest before I started my phd, it was 3 months in that I narrowed it slightly. And I didn’t do a Masters either is it’s not like I specialised before. In my experience (and I must stress, it’s only mine I can comment on) it’s ok to have a general idea and discussions with supervisors can narrow it. I also wasn’t sure I was cut out for a PhD but I love it, and I’m just learning as I go. I felt that the only requirement was that I was passionate about research and willing to learn and work hard, and the rest just fell into place. So If you’re just worried about being good enough for a phd on some level, don’t be, because everyone feels the same and it all usually works out. And I guess in the UK our PhDs are shorter (~3 years max) so it’s less of a time consideration, so I can see why 5+ years seems daunting. I would say try and volunteer or get a job in a lab and see if you like it and see what happens.

I’m sorry I can’t be more help, feel free to message me if you have any further questions!

Or maybe someone else can offer some advice?

    Hi!

    I’m not sure whether you can work in research without the Masters or PhD if I’m being honest. I volunteered as a research assistant during undergrad, but I’m assuming jobs that pay MAY want you to have the research background. It might be different for lab technicians? I’m not sure as I’ve just gone down the research route and everyone I work with in the lab and uni is either doing their phd or has it already.

    I think it’s important to point out that I had no real idea about a narrow research interest before I started my phd, it was 3 months in that I narrowed it slightly. And I didn’t do a Masters either is it’s not like I specialised before. In my experience (and I must stress, it’s only mine I can comment on) it’s ok to have a general idea and discussions with supervisors can narrow it. I also wasn’t sure I was cut out for a PhD but I love it, and I’m just learning as I go. I felt that the only requirement was that I was passionate about research and willing to learn and work hard, and the rest just fell into place. So If you’re just worried about being good enough for a phd on some level, don’t be, because everyone feels the same and it all usually works out. And I guess in the UK our PhDs are shorter (~3 years max) so it’s less of a time consideration, so I can see why 5+ years seems daunting. I would say try and volunteer or get a job in a lab and see if you like it and see what happens.

    I’m sorry I can’t be more help, feel free to message me if you have any further questions!

    Or maybe someone else can offer some advice?
  8. neurosciencestuff:

    Tiny chip mimics brain, delivers supercomputer speed

    Researchers Thursday unveiled a powerful new postage-stamp size chip delivering supercomputer performance using a process that mimics the human brain.

    The so-called “neurosynaptic” chip is a breakthrough that opens a wide new range of computing possibilities from self-driving cars to artificial intelligence systems that can installed on a smartphone, the scientists say.

    The researchers from IBM, Cornell Tech and collaborators from around the world said they took an entirely new approach in design compared with previous computer architecture, moving toward a system called “cognitive computing.”

    "We have taken inspiration from the cerebral cortex to design this chip," said IBM chief scientist for brain-inspired computing, Dharmendra Modha, referring to the command center of the brain.

    Read more

About me

Hi, and welcome to my blog! This is where I collect things that I find interesting about the brain, neuroscience, pyschology and more recently, grad school.

Ok so first, a bit about my background. I did a B.Sc. (Hons) in Psychology, and now I am a first year neuroscience and neuroimaging Ph.D. student. In my PhD I look at the brain mechanisms underlying multisensory perception, using functional imaging, psychophysics and computational modelling.

To make things a bit easier, I tag things that are related to my PhD or any of my side projects here.

Questions? I am more than happy to answer any questions you have, and I really enjoy it, so if you have something to you want to know, click the “Ask Me” button above and I will do my best to answer you. If you prefer me to answer privately, please mention it in your ask. You can see some of the previous questions I’ve answered here.

Finally, some of my writing can be found here.

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