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Are consumers aware that they are drawn to the centre when choosing products?
If you own a business where you display products, like shop, a restaurant or a bar for example, how do you choose where to place products? If you are shopping for a gift, how do you decide which one you really want?
I figured that with Christmas coming up, this might be interesting to some people.
Research has shown that when people choose products, they have a very particular focus - the centre. Apparently, consumers are more likely to purchase products that have been placed in the centre of a display without even being aware of it. 
The researchers used eye tracking devices to track how people look for and choose products - they found that people would increase the amount of time spent looking at the centre of displays in the final seconds of their decision, and it was at that point they determined which product they would choose. When the researchers asked participants why they chose that product, they couldn’t really give them a reason - and they certainly weren’t consciously aware of any increased looking time towards the products in the middle. 
The researchers claim that research such as this can be beneficial to business owner and consumers - the former can place their products efficiently to drive sales, and the latter can actively choose to look away from the rows of products before making their decision. 
Happy shopping!
 Read the full story

    Are consumers aware that they are drawn to the centre when choosing products?

    If you own a business where you display products, like shop, a restaurant or a bar for example, how do you choose where to place products? If you are shopping for a gift, how do you decide which one you really want?

    I figured that with Christmas coming up, this might be interesting to some people.

    Research has shown that when people choose products, they have a very particular focus - the centre. Apparently, consumers are more likely to purchase products that have been placed in the centre of a display without even being aware of it. 

    The researchers used eye tracking devices to track how people look for and choose products - they found that people would increase the amount of time spent looking at the centre of displays in the final seconds of their decision, and it was at that point they determined which product they would choose. When the researchers asked participants why they chose that product, they couldn’t really give them a reason - and they certainly weren’t consciously aware of any increased looking time towards the products in the middle. 

    The researchers claim that research such as this can be beneficial to business owner and consumers - the former can place their products efficiently to drive sales, and the latter can actively choose to look away from the rows of products before making their decision. 

    Happy shopping!

    Read the full story

Notes

  1. cocainepony reblogged this from psycholar
  2. psycholar posted this

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Hi, and welcome to my blog!

This is where I write about and reblog things that I find interesting about the brain, psychology, neuroscience and grad school.

I have a B.Sc. (Hons) in Psychology and I am now a first year Ph.D. student. Right now I investigate the underlying predictive neural mechanisms of multisensory perception, using functional imaging, psychophysics and computational modelling. I tag things that are related to my PhD or any of my side projects here.


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